#My Baachan 23. POW Camps

Prisoner of War camps in Ontario were originally set up for German and Italian soldiers captured in Europe. They were also used to incarcerate Japanese Nationals who were leaders in the Japanese Canadian community, and others who protested the separation from their families.  This drawing is based on a photo of Angler, in the winter of 1942. NNM 1994.48.3.a

Prisoner of War camps in Ontario were originally set up for German and Italian soldiers captured in Europe. They were also used to incarcerate Japanese Nationals who were leaders in the Japanese Canadian community, and others who protested the separation from their families.

This drawing is based on a photo of Angler, in the winter of 1942.
NNM 1994.48.3.a

#MyBaachan 12. Logging #NikkeiHistory

Logging was another resource industries in British Columbia that attracted Japanese men as labour from the late 1800s. Again, they would often work with others from their home prefecture and rely on bosses who dealt with the companies.  This drawing is based on a photo from the  Sedai website  taken around 1910 in Chemainus on Vancouver Island in British Columbia   

Logging was another resource industries in British Columbia that attracted Japanese men as labour from the late 1800s.
Again, they would often work with others from their home prefecture and rely on bosses who dealt with the companies.

This drawing is based on a photo from the Sedai website taken around 1910 in Chemainus on Vancouver Island in British Columbia

 

#MyBachan 11. Fishing #Nikkei #history

Manzo Nagano and many other Japanese, came to work in the growing fishing industry along the coast of British Columbia. They usually worked with people from the same village or prefecture, under a bossu who could negotiate work, gear, and housing. In Steveston, Gihei Kuno encouraged others from Wakayama to come. This drawing is based on a photo on the  Sedai web site , a wonderful collection of oral histories.

Manzo Nagano and many other Japanese, came to work in the growing fishing industry along the coast of British Columbia. They usually worked with people from the same village or prefecture, under a bossu who could negotiate work, gear, and housing. In Steveston, Gihei Kuno encouraged others from Wakayama to come.
This drawing is based on a photo on the Sedai web site, a wonderful collection of oral histories.

The 100 Year Old Man who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

I am loving this story, listening to the audiobook downloaded to my phone from the library, usually while washing the dishes. Every chapter is a delightful surprise, after a spry 100 year old man steps out of the window. We also find out about his past extraordinary encounters with major historical characters. It reminds me a little of Forrest Gump. This story is perhaps more of a parody of human behaviour. I have given talks on Japanese Canadian history, using my grandmother's life to illustrate the major events, and am intrigued by how a long life intersects with historic eras.

Landscapes of Injustice Presentation @ VPL Jan. 14

I attended a presentation by Landscapes of Injustice, an extraordinary undertaking looking at the incarceration and dispossession of Japanese Canadians during the 1940s. It involves many grad students from various institutions, along with a council of Japanese Canadians from across Canada, some of whom spoke about their work and experiences. Involving people not personally connected to the events somehow makes it feel like this really was a significant episode in Canadian history and not just family history. Eiji Okawa, raised in Japan, looked at community records and his translation Japanese written at the time seems essential to understanding the Issei.